How People Learn: My “Mash-up” Learning Theory

What a thoughtful article!
I’m also interested in combining both theories. For me, I find connectivism just an extension to the constructivism. That is why in my PhD, I didn’t try to create another theory, but designed a model in which I used a strategy that reflects constructivism + a tool that supports extended and connected learning.

Thanks so much for sharing your ideas!
🙂

Dalia Allencherry

how people learn

I have been thinking about coming up with my own “mash-up” learning theory for about a month. I am a constructivist, especially a social constructivist. I am also a fan of digital learning and connectivism principles. Therefore, I want my “mash-up” theory to include principles of constructivism, social aspect, and principles that support effective learning in the digital world. I am calling my “mash-up” theory “Connective Constructivism”. I searched online to find if there already exists a theory called connective constructivism, but couldn’t find any results.

According to the connective constructivism theory, learning happens as a result of active constructive process by means of a learner connecting with a system, objects and/or with other learner(s). There can be a learner to system (computer/network)/object or learner to other learner(s) connections. Constructivism states knowledge as constructed based on personal experiences and hypotheses of the environment. These personal experiences and hypotheses can be digital (virtual)…

View original post 256 more words

Advertisements

Surviving a PhD – 10 Top Tips…

Yes, finished is better than perfect …

The Thesis Whisperer

This post is by Dr Alex Hope, a  Lecturer in Sustainable Development and Project Management at Northumbria University in the United Kingdom and was originally post on his blog. Alex is also on Twitter where he tweets about sustainability, academia, PhD advice and life. I hope you will head on over there and check out what he has to say!

I was awarded my PhD in January this year following a successful viva in November 2011, so thought I would try and summarise my experiences over the last 3-4 years and see if I could come up with some key points of advice from start to finish…

Tip 1 – Academics need you: Most are keen to speak to any potential student who has a good research idea as a good record of successful PhD supervisions is essential to build a successful academic career. Don’t be afraid to approach a…

View original post 1,109 more words

My Top Posts in 2015

I did not write a lot this year as I was a little bit busy working on my PhD. Believe me, I missed it so much, but you know time is so limited. I hope 2016 will be a great year full of more learning and thus more reflections to flourish my digital space. Before saying Goodbye to 2015, I just wanted to share some posts that were frequently viewed by my readers.

My selection is based on two criteria:

2. Blogging in the Classroom

A great post about using blogging in classrooms.

Techie Teachers' Tricks

ALL I WISH I’D KNOWN WHEN I STARTED BLOGGING WITH MY STUDENTS
(Our class blog had 10,000 visitors in its  first 2 months-its link on the right)

Blog Post Agenda:

BLOGS ON THE WEB
STEPS FOR USING BLOGS IN THE CLASSROOM:

  1.      Blogging release forms
  2.      Blogging platforms
  3.      The role of your blog
  4.      Initial lessons
  5.      Ideas for blog posts
  6.      Assessing blogs

BLOGS ON THE WEB

In an era when collaboration is such a handy option, both teachers and students should find ways to get the most out of it because, just like Vygotsky said, people learn from each other and learning arises from social interactions. I acknowledge the fact that just like I learn from other adults, children can learn from each other. In this era of speed, people don’t have time to reinvent…

View original post 1,663 more words

Tips & Tricks: How to get books and articles for free?

Seven years ago, finding books related to the areas of my research was like a headache. This is maybe because I didn’t know more about the power of the Internet. But now, it is like a piece of cake. Taking an online course by Google about searching, following people via social media and spending much time browsing, I have learned some ways that I consider helpful to any researcher. In this post, I will tell you some tips and tricks that can help you to find what you need:

Continue reading

12 metacognition-modelling strategies for the foreign language classroom

A wow blog post about how to promote metacognition among your students ….

The Language Gym

wilson-metacognition-460x345

Metacognitive skills are arguably the most important set of skills we need for our journey through life as they orchestrate every cognitive skill involved in problem-solving, decision-making and self-monitoring (both cognitive and socio-affective). We start acquiring them at a very early age at home, in school, in the playground and in any other social context an individual interacts with other human beings. But what are metacognitive skills?

What is metacognition?

I often refer to metacognition as ‘the voice inside your head’ which helps you solve problems in life by asking you questions like:

  • What is the problem here?
  • Based on what I know already about this task, how can I solve this problem?
  • Is this correct?
  • How is this coming along?
  • If I carry on like this where am I going to get?
  • What resources should I use to carry out this task?
  • What should come first? What should come…

View original post 2,184 more words

Metacognition and reflection are NOT synonymous …

InsideMetacognition and reflection are often used interchangeably in educational conversations. However, there is a definite distinction between these two terms. Metacognition is the one that is often misused and understood among educators, teachers and researchers. I always read and hear that it simply means “thinking about thinking.”

What does it mean?

Continue reading